Originally, songs were only available with DRM and were encoded at 128 kbit/s.

itunes zes when updating ipod-52itunes zes when updating ipod-9

Itunes zes when updating ipod video

Originally, mobile users had to be connected to a Wi-Fi network in order to enter the store, hence its original name: i Tunes Wi-Fi Music Store.

However, at Macworld 2009, Apple issued a software update which automatically allowed 3G and EDGE users to access the store's full functionality for files smaller than 10 megabytes (MB).

Developers can decide which prices they want to charge for apps, from a pre-set list of pricing tiers, from free to several hundred dollars.

When someone downloads an App, 70 percent of the purchase goes to the developer(s), and 30 percent goes to Apple.

While most downloaded files initially included usage restrictions enforced by Fair Play, Apple's implementation of digital rights management (DRM), i Tunes later initiated a shift into selling DRM-free music in most countries, marketed as i Tunes Plus.

On January 6, 2009, Apple announced that DRM had been removed from 80% of its music catalog in the US.

The i OS 3.0 update added the ability to download movies, TV shows, audiobooks, i Tunes U, and ringtones on mobile devices, in addition to the previously available songs and podcasts.

On February 18, 2010, Apple increased the 10 MB 3G download limit to 20 MB.

Following the introduction of i Tunes Store, individual songs were all sold for the same price, though Apple introduced multiple prices in 2007.