What was more fascinating to me is that both Orthodox and non-religious Jewish friends had been using it and talking to me about it in the past month.

Although you can filter for only Jewish options on many dating sites, and even denominations of Judaism on others, JSwipe's layout somehow made it all easier.

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I actually downloaded the app last summer and was embarrassed because none of my friends seemed to use it. Now it can't open on my phone due to what appears to be software incompatibility.

In my mother's most adorable and depressing comment on my dating life, she immediately offered to buy me a brand new i Phone for the sole purpose of letting me use JSwipe. I declined, but not because I didn't want to use JSwipe.

This wasn't even my own account on JSwipe, which has been described as the Jewish Tinder.

JSwipe is neither the first nor the most recent Jewish dating app.

A sad-faced orange Star of David flashed across the i Phone screen as we swiped left on “James” (not his real name).

The gentleman was listed as Orthodox and kosher, which is way too religious for my friend whose JSwipe account I was test-driving. “Shalom.” and onto to the next nice Jewish boy (or nice Jewish girl if we wanted to go that route).

According to the Pew Research Center, almost a full-third (32 percent) of Jews born after 1980 describe themselves as having no religion, more than any other age group.

A solid majority of 58 percent of Jews who got married after 2005 chose a spouse outside the faith, compared to the 17 percent of American Jews who got married before 1970.

For some, it’s the desire of a shared background and cultural values, but there is also a certain desire to perpetuate and strengthen the Jewish community itself.“I have a survivalist instinct,” said Ben, a 28-year-old New Yorker.

“I believe in the historical pressure put on our community.

Marriages were not so much about romance as making suitable pairs and making sure Jews stayed with Jews and kept the small and heavily persecuted population alive. Marrying another Jew was not just a personal simcha (joy), but one for the community.